All Blog Posts

Clinic Director Presents at World Refugee Day Event

On Saturday, Immigration Clinic Director Stacy Kern-Scheerer presented at a World Refugee Day celebration hosted by Commonwealth Catholic Charities in Newport News. The event, which resulted in a spectacular turnout, was a chance to enjoy food and community, while also providing valuable information and services. Eastern Virginia Medical School was on site providing health screenings,Continue reading “Clinic Director Presents at World Refugee Day Event”

Partnership with Library Adds New Resources to Assist Afghan Asylum Seekers

The Immigration Clinic and Earl Gregg Swem Library have partnered to assist William & Mary students in their research for Afghan asylum cases. Building on the Asylum Country Conditions Research Guide first published in October 2020, research librarian Liz Bellamy ‘13 and the Clinic’s IJC Fellow Nicole Alanko, J.D. ‘18 worked together to add moreContinue reading “Partnership with Library Adds New Resources to Assist Afghan Asylum Seekers”

Afghans Living in the U.S. Deserve More Than Temporary Protected Status

By Mike Arnone, J.D. Class of 2022 Since the chaotic withdrawal of American forces from Afghanistan in August 2021, more than 76,000 Afghans have been evacuated to the United States. A majority were granted parole under Operation Allies Welcome, allowing them to legally remain in the United States for two years. In March, the DepartmentContinue reading “Afghans Living in the U.S. Deserve More Than Temporary Protected Status”

The Class of 2022: A Class of Superlatives 

The William & Mary Class of 2022 was superlative in almost every measure. This year, more students than ever before enrolled in Immigration Clinic I and II.  With the increased enrolment, the Clinic accepted more clients for representation this year than ever before. The Clinic’s caseload more than doubled in order to accommodate the needsContinue reading “The Class of 2022: A Class of Superlatives “

“Bad Immigrants”: Disability, Addiction, Eugenics, and Immigration Exclusions

By Elena Pruett-Fiederlein, J.D. Class of 2022 Many of us have heard variations of the “good immigrant” myth, or the popular notion that some immigrants to the United States––whether through their extraordinary abilities, financial prospects, or unique histories––offer better contributions to American society and are therefore more deserving of welcome than others.1 As a studentContinue reading ““Bad Immigrants”: Disability, Addiction, Eugenics, and Immigration Exclusions”

Zigging with the Zags: The Importance of Rolling with the Punches in Immigration Practice

By Thummim Park, J.D. Class of 2022 The sky is blue. The grass is green. The immigration field is constantly changing. No two clients are the same. These are facts of life that I have come to learn at various points in my life, with the latter two bringing various challenges. The mercurial nature ofContinue reading “Zigging with the Zags: The Importance of Rolling with the Punches in Immigration Practice”

White Pickets: A Generational Story of How DACA Keeps the American Dream Alive

By Savanna Johnson, J.D. Class of 2022 Aurora* fled from Guatemala in the Spring of 2003 to escape gang violence and threats on her life. She came to the United States with her four young children, all under the age of eight, not knowing when she would see her home country again. As her childrenContinue reading “White Pickets: A Generational Story of How DACA Keeps the American Dream Alive”

H.R. 6577: It’s Time for an Independent Immigration Court

By Dylan Abrokwa-Jassor, B.A. Class of 2024 The rights that most Americans expect when entering a courthouse are not protected in immigration court. Rights to due process and fair trials, cornerstones of American judiciaries, have been compromised in the immigration system. In recent years, executive policy has pressured immigration judges to “accelerate their decisions”1 whichContinue reading “H.R. 6577: It’s Time for an Independent Immigration Court”

Global Xenophobia: How Racism Persists Despite War

By Haarika Reddy, J.D. Class of 2022 Why has the Ukrainian refugee crisis demanded an urgent policy response globally when other wars have not? What makes Ukrainian refugees different than refugees from Yemen, Syria, Afghanistan, or Iraq? Is it the location? Does this mean that European refugees are more deserving of global intervention and supportContinue reading “Global Xenophobia: How Racism Persists Despite War”

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